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Bryan Fischer: Boston Globe, New York Times, BBC, NPR owe Scott Lively an apology
Thursday, February 03, 2011 10:01 AM

By Bryan Fischer 

In Uganda, a leading homosexual activist, David Kato, was murdered last Wednesday, beaten with a hammer in his home and dying on his way to the hospital. Scott Lively, author of a well-researched and heavily documented book, The Pink Swastika, has been blamed for his death. 

Even while admitting that the murder was “still being investigated,” the Boston Globe was quick to lay the blame at Lively’s doorstep, who, along with other pro-family experts, visited Uganda in the spring of 2009 to raise awareness of the many social and health pathologies associated with homosexual behavior. 

The New York Times, the BBC and NPR all interviewed Lively in recent weeks, trying to blame him for what they believe is a rising tide of homicidal anti-gay fervor in Uganda. 

Last Friday, the Globe quoted the leader of one of Uganda’s leading homosexual activist groups: “David’s death is a result of the hatred planted in Uganda by U.S. evangelicals in 2009. The Ugandan government and the so-called U.S. evangelicals must take responsibility for David’s blood.” 

And it turns out that the Globe, the New York Times, the BBC and NPR are not alone in fingering Lively as an accomplice. Google “David Kato murder, Scott Lively” this morning, and you will get 17,200 hits. Almost all of this scapegoating was done, mind you, before police had any idea who had swung the hammer. 

Well, it turns out that Lively had absolutely nothing, nada, zip, zilch to do with any part of this gruesome killing. 

According to Reuters, a man has now confessed to the killing, and police are saying a “personal disagreement” let to Kato’s untimely death. Meaning, of course, the whole thing had nothing to do with Lively or any other pro-family leader in America. 

In fact, the police spokesman said quite pointedly that the murder “wasn’t a robbery and it wasn’t because Kato was an activist.” So the whole hate crime meme is out the window, gone, history, in the archives. 

The confessed murderer, one Nsubuga Enock, is a “well-known thief,” according to police, and had been in prison until January 24. He had been staying with Kato since getting out. 

Enock was arrested at his girlfriend’s house, and so it appears that he swings both ways. Kato’s driver has also been arrested in connection with the murder, and early reports indicated that both money and clothing were missing. And since Enock was in prison for theft, the dots aren’t too hard to connect here.

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